In Zulu culture kinship has lost all of its meaning. The Zulu communities were szuluwedding.jpgorganized regardless of kinship according to the ability of the local chief to recruit a following. Zulu leaders see kinship as more of a competition. In the past however this is how Zulu culture was organized...

Zulu settlements were patrilocal extended-family or clan barrios. Polygyny was their social norm for families. Each kraal was the homestead of a male, which included a separate hut for each of his wives. The huts were arranged, according to the status of the wives, around the central cattle kraal. The kraal head had the responsibility of keeping law and order and settling disputes. Disputes that could not be settled in the kraal or cases of a special nature were dealt with by the district head.
Zulu society were organized into patrilineal sibs. Through a process of growth, subdivision, and incorporation of aliens, the sib developed into a "tribe," which, however, is still known by the name of the ancestor of the dominant sib. The sibs are divided into lineages, which were composed of descendants of a common ancestor in the near past.